Karin Wolfe: "EXCELLENT AND SUBLIME, FECUND AND FAST": FRANCESCO TREVISANI (1656–1746), FIRST PAINTER OF ROME

“EXCELLENT AND SUBLIME, FECUND AND FAST”: FRANCESCO TREVISANI (1656–1746), FIRST PAINTER OF ROME
The BSR is delighted to host a lecture in collaboration with the Georgian Group

Karin Wolfe, Research Fellow, British School at Rome

on Monday 14 March 2011, at 6.00 p.m.

at the British Academy, 10–11 Carlton House Terrace,
London, SW1Y 5AH

If you are not a member of the Georgian Group or a Subscriber to the British School at Rome and wish to attend this event, please book online or alternatively e-mail Kirsten to check availability and then send a cheque for the required amount to The Georgian Group, 6 Fitzroy Square, London W1T 5DX.

BSR Subscribers who would like to attend are requested to RSVP to Gill Clark or 020–79695202.

Francesco Trevisani’s standing as the most eminent painter in Rome in the first half of the eighteenth century has been almost completely forgotten today, except among a small group of collectors and cognoscenti. His work was assiduously collected, not only in Italy, but throughout Europe and even Russia by princes, popes, cardinals and kings, and his studio was the first port of call for English tourists anxious to sit for a portrait — Trevisani early on set the standard for Grand Tour portraiture. Lione Pascoli, Trevisani’s biographer and author of the quote in the title of this lecture, considered that Trevisani’s reputation was based on his ability to compose and paint a wide range of subjects — he aspired to be a ‘universal painter’ and his oeuvre includes everything from landscapes to history paintings. Equally, however, his reputation rested on the refined designs and painterly quality of his works, especially the inimitable finish and porcelain-like glazes of his immensely popular devotional cabinet pictures.

This lecture will introduce his most important paintings, many of which have only recently re-appeared on the market or which have remained unrecognized in private collections. New documentary research also sheds light on the painter’s role as courtier to Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni, his personal life and friendships with musicians and artists, and reveals much about the professional practices of his studio.